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20130228
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
have it arranged so it's the nonprofit organization that is applying to us for permission to do it. they're responsible for getting volunteer waivers from all of the participants. our funding to provide them with the supplies and the support to do the wipe out is based on them following our guidelines which are all safety rules provided we don't allow them to use any chemical materials. they're only allowed to use paint. the volunteers must be 15 years of age. so, if they violate any of those criteria, then it's the volunteer organization that's basically not complied with our requirements. so, they have no issue basically with us. in terms of liability just to ensure that we don't have any problems with property owners in terms of painting, we ensure that we get $2 million of liability insurance. that blanketly coffers all of our volunteer program. that is a range to cover my program. iest mate how many volunteers i'm going to have per year and basically buy an insurance policy to cover that as well. in terms of safety i think martin can speak more to the issue of, you know, going
's city property. and as far as the type of paint we use, we don't use aerosol paint. we don't use solvents or thinners or anything like that. so, i'm not exposing the kids in my program to any dangerous chemicals or anything like that. but -- >> [speaker not understood]. >> but i am present and that is a big concern. and you have every right to be concerned about that, because you could cause a violent reaction. -- from the wrong person. i'm not saying that every person who is involved in graffiti vandalism is violent or is going to take disrespect to it. they know it's part of the game for the most part. but you could have a bad incident by painting over someone's graffiti. >> we're going to continue going back and forth. >> one other point. just two quick points with our program. you know, when we have a mural going up in a certain police district, we inform that police district that it's happening. sometimes an artist can be painting a mural and they can site them for vandalizing. we want them to know it's part of our program and also let the police precinct know it's happening
on to find out, okay, this is the application we need to use for this surface and this is the, you know, a different application we need to use for another surface? and how can you prevent that ghosting? because if it's still there, it's there. just because you remove the pigment doesn't mean that it's gone. and like you stated yourself, when do you say, enough is enough? because if you have an historic building and you want the graffiti removed but you have the ghost there, is it really removed? >> well, historic buildings, dpw would not be removing the graffiti. and remember also on private property, the property owner is responsible for it. dpw as a rule does not do the abatement. so, whether they are or aren't using the correct materials to remove it off of brick, it's based on who they hire or who they get to do the work. we are aware for the time when we did do t we have several different products based on the type of surface. and staff was trained at that time, but that's when we were doing abatement on private property. >> i can just help a little bit. again, from the historic b
basically with us. in terms of liability just to ensure that we don't have any problems with property owners in terms of painting, we ensure that we get $2 million of liability insurance. that blanketly coffers all of our volunteer program. that is a range to cover my program. iest mate how many volunteers i'm going to have per year and basically buy an insurance policy to cover that as well. in terms of safety i think martin can speak more to the issue of, you know, going into areas where there could be problems. edmonton overall is pretty safe community. we haven't really had any experience with people sort of being there present when we're painting over it. so, i can't really speak to that in terms of issues. but the liability issue is pretty well covered. i have a guide that's available on my website that outlines all of our forms and criteria that they go through and the property owners are also required to sign off a form giving the volunteer agency permission to paint their building. so, we're distancing ourselves from that so we don't have a problem. >> before i became a consul ant
's -- to me, it's almost like the vandals are laughing at us. >> larry, did you want to respond to that? >> yeah. so, we photograph all the tags and the inspectors go out and look at them. if the actual tack has been removed, then the graffiti is considered removed. the fact that the ghosting stays there, it becomes a very difficult thing at what level you're going to hold the property owner responsible. * tag for removing the ghosting. a lot of times that's not very easy to do and, so, are you still going to hold them accountable when they've made the effort, removed the initial tag? and they can't remove the ghost, i don't think so. as a city, i don't think that would be where i would want to be. if they showed they made the effort to remove it, unless it's extremely bad, i think they're doing their due diligence to try and remove the graffiti. >> all right, thank you. do you want to -- is that one red or is that -- because there was red and it was asked by the same person. >> it was red and then asked by the same person. >> you know what, i can see a bunch of hands up here. iv see t
-vehicle escort. our police department is all behind this. i use magnetic signs on my vehicle now and i always wear a safety vest. never go alone. we set up five different conditions to do that so we never have a repeat. it's not worth it. >> he's from hayward. >> he's in hayward and i'm going to come over to gideon unless anybody else there has a response to this. gideon if you'd like to stand up. >> i'd like to ask about, there are three pernicious forms of graffiti that in some ways have actually gotten worse. as the city of san francisco has greatly improved the graffiti situation, i've noticed that there's more graffiti on concrete, on sidewalks, on curbs and also on trees, tree trunks. and tree trunks, graffiti on trees to me is the lowest form of graffiti that there is because it just -- it is so lacking in any consciousness about the environment and life and so forth. so, i'm wondering when i was in a graffiti advisory board, several of us tried to get some special attention paid to those things as well as glass etching. i don't know if glass etching has gotten worse or not, but partic
helps us with all of our fliers and everything that we need to do. john has been tireless. he comes to my house on fridays at 5:30 for meetings. he's a great, great supervisor and a champion for our district. and we're excited about this year. we're going to put in a park. we're going to do safety initiatives. we're looking for grant money for more beautification. if anybody is interested in starting a neighborhood watch and getting involved, call me and i can help you get started. it's a great thing to know your neighbors, even the ones who are a pain in the neck. it's a great thing to know your neighbors. [laughter] (applause) >> i would just like to say thank you to all of our neighbors because we have lived in that neighborhood for 37 years and it's just been such a joy to meet people who live right across the street and never knew what wonderful neighbors i had until we started the neighborhood watch group. so, i would strongly advise everyone to start a neighborhood watch group. it's great. and thanks to patricia, she's done an outstanding job and i'm so happy she took over as
with the idea of a garden tour and a lot of us thought, a garden tour? our neighborhood? who is going to come? well, we had every -- we've done it for six years. every year we've grown incrementally. after the first two years of raising money for the library -- there's our new library -- we then it was such a great community builder that we recently decided to keep wanting to volunteering and do it. we established a scholarship at city college for the horticultural department. and we have just gone gangbusters. we get good press and we get to see everybody's neighbor -- all our neighbors' gardens. because of the way san francisco s you get to be veuyer because usually you have to go through their garage or their house to see the gardens. and ruth gets known through the neighborhood because she's constantly peeking over fences and leaving fliers in people's mailboxes saying, do you want to be on the garden tour, and all this sort of thing. but anyway, so, we've -- just to show you how much the neighborhood has gotten to know each other, all the people in the portola, wave your hand. [cheering
of folks while they're still with us. so, the lifetime achievement award is for someone we feel we should take this moment in time and thank in person for their contributions to the city. and i think we have this year's winner epitomizes the kind of person that we should take the time to acknowledge and to go further into that i'd like to actually take a moment and invite now our supervisor district 8 malia cohen who would like to share her opening thoughts on this award. (applause) >> can i just tell you how good it feels to be up here, to look out to see all the people that make everything possible, that really makes san francisco wonderful? and i just have got to give a special shout out. you knew i grew up in the portola for those that don't know. [cheering and applauding] >> right there at the intersection of silly man and colby, my parents still live there. that's where it started for me. but tonight is a night that we have abopportunity * to up lift and support and say thank you to all the people that certainly provide me support and provide me the motivation to get up and come to
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)